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True-Tension Stringing Machines (TTSM)
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TRUE-TENSION STRINGING MACHINE MODEL 2020

OPERATIONS MANUAL SUPPLEMENT: PART 2

TENSION GUIDE LINES - Part 2  (This was not included in the original Manual)

The reference tensions listed in the manual are the average racquet manufacturer’s recommended tensions at the time the manual was written. These reference tensions are multiplied by 70% to get the actual main string tension setting on the True-Tension Stringing Machine. The Conversion Scale, that is on the tensioning assembly of the machine, multiplies the reference tension by 80% to get the actual main string tension setting on the True-Tension Stringing Machine.

Because of the large variable in tensions from stringer to stringer and machine to machine plus improper adjustment of the string clamps, which causes some tension loss, the 70% conversion was on the low side for some stringers. To compensate for these variations we multiplied the reference tension by 80% to get the True-Tension setting on the Conversion Scale.

It is better to use the Conversion Scale because it allows you to take any reference tension and easily convert it to the actual tension. You must keep in mind that there is a large variation in tensions among stringers and yours may be slightly different from our recommendations so you may have to make adjustments accordingly.

The tension that you set on the True-Tension Stringing Machine is the actual tension you will leave on the strings in the racquet.

The present ratio of cross string tensions to the main string tensions in the manual is correct. If you have a frame that is not listed, just compare the shape of the bow to one that is listed. The size doesn't make any difference, it is the shape that controls what that ratio will be.

The four point racquet supporting system of the True-Tension Stringing Machine will show you if the cross string tension is too low, too high, or correct. When you have finished stringing a racquet and removed the racquet hold down clamps, check how the racquet fits in the supports. If the racquet can move side ways it means that the cross string tension is too high forcing the sides to pull in making the bow narrower and longer. If the racquet is tight in the supports and gets shorter and wider when you remove it, the cross string tension is too low. On many oversize racquets and different shape designs the sides will pull in without making the bow longer. This is a design characteristic and no amount of care in stringing will prevent this type of distortion.

Let the racquet supporting system of the True-Tension Stringing Machine guide you in determining the correct cross string tensions on racquets.

Remember that the designed shape of the bow of the racquet dictates what that ratio will be according to the laws of physics and mathematics and no one can change this fact.

If you do not balance the main and cross string tensions accordingly, you can easily leave highly undesirable and damaging stresses in the bow of the frame.

by John Balaban

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